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Experimental Semiconductor Physics

Prof. Martin Stutzmann

Research Field

Our work at the Walter Schottky Institut deals with various aspects of new and non conventional semiconductor materials and material combinations: semiconductors with a wide bandgap (GaN, InGaN, AlGaN, diamond, SiC) disordered semiconductors (amorphous, nanocrystalline, and polycrystalline) advanced thin film systems (silicon-based luminescent layers, thin film solar cells, organic/anorganic heterosystems, biofunctionalized semiconductors). Most of these material systems are prepared in our group by suitable deposition techniques (MBE, MOCVD, Plasma-enhanced CVD, e-beam evaporation, sputtering). Their efficient optimization is based on the large pool of structural, optical, and electrical characterization techniques available in our Institute. Complementary to the usual spectroscopic techniques we have developed and employ a variety of highly sensitive methods which enable us to study in particular the influence of defects on the electronic performance of materials and devices. Such techniques include subgap absorption spectroscopy, optically induced capacitance spectroscopy and, in particular, modern spin resonance techniques which are applied to various materials systems and devices for spintronics.

In addition to the preparation and characterization of new semiconductor materials we also work on the modification and processing of semiconductors with pulsed high power laser systems (laser-crystallization, holographic nano structuring, laser-induced etching) and investigate the potential of new material systems for novel device structures. Recent examples include nano structured thin film solar cells, high electron mobility transistors based on AlGaN/GaN hetero structures, as well as UV-detectors, sensors and biosensors.

Learn more about the different research areas on the research pages of the Stutzmann, Brandt, and Garrido groups.

Address/Contact

Am Coulombwall 4
85748 Garching b. München
+49 89 289 12761
Fax: +49 89 289 12737

Members of the Research Group

Professor

Office

Scientists

Students

Other Staff

Teaching

Course with Participations of Group Members

Titel und Modulzuordnung
ArtSWSDozent(en)Termine
Advanced Semiconductor Physics
eLearning-Kurs
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
VO 4 Stutzmann, M. Mo, 10:00–12:00, PH HS3
Di, 12:00–14:00, PH HS3
Quantum Sensing
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
VO 2 Brandt, M. Hübl, H.
Mitwirkende: Bucher, D.
Do, 10:00–12:00, ZNN 0.001
Aktuelle Probleme der Halbleiterphysik und fortgeschrittenen Materialien
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
HS 2 Sharp, I. Stutzmann, M. Fr, 10:30–12:30, WSI S101
Topical Issues in Magneto- and Spin Electronics
LV-Unterlagen
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
HS 2 Brandt, M. Hübl, H.
Mitwirkende: Althammer, M.Geprägs, S.
Mi, 11:30–13:00, WSI S101
Exercise to Advanced Semiconductor Physics
eLearning-Kurs
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
UE 2 Moser, P.
Leitung/Koordination: Stutzmann, M.
Termine in Gruppen
Exercise to Quantum Sensing
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
UE 1
Leitung/Koordination: Brandt, M.
Do, 11:30–13:00, WMI 143
FOPRA-Versuch 08: Hochauflösende Röntgenbeugung (AEP, BIO, KM)
aktuelle Informationen
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
PR 1 Hoffmann, T. Sirotti, E.
Leitung/Koordination: Stutzmann, M.
FOPRA-Versuch 15: Quanteninformation in Stickstoff-Fehlstellen-Zentren in Diamant (AEP, KM, QST-EX)
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
PR 1 Todenhagen, L. Vogl, D.
Leitung/Koordination: Brandt, M.
FOPRA-Versuch 28: Halbleiter-Photoelektrochemie (AEP, KM)
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
PR 1 Bienek, O. Kuhl, M. Kunzelmann, V.
Leitung/Koordination: Sharp, I.
FOPRA-Versuch 50: Photovoltaik (AEP, KM)
aktuelle Informationen
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
PR 1 Pantle, F.
Leitung/Koordination: Stutzmann, M.
Literatur-Seminar zu Festkörperphysik
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
SE 2 Stutzmann, M. Mi, 13:00–14:30, WSI S101
Repetitorium zu Aktuelle Probleme der Halbleiterphysik und fortgeschrittenen Materialien
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
RE 2
Leitung/Koordination: Stutzmann, M.
Repetitorium zu Aktuelle Themen der Magneto- und Spinelektronik
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
RE 2
Leitung/Koordination: Hübl, H.
Schottky-Seminar
Diese Lehrveranstaltung ist keinem Modul zugeordnet.
SE 2 Belkin, M. Brandt, M. Finley, J. Holleitner, A. Sharp, I. … (insgesamt 6) Di, 13:15–14:30, WSI S101

Offers for Theses in the Group

Chemical reactions and spins
Elementary steps in chemical reaction pathways are difficult to disentangle. Often, such elementary steps involve radicals, molecules with unsaturated paramagnetic bonds. This allows to develop unique techniques monitoring their chemical reaction via spin selection rules based on the Pauli principle. You will develop highly sensitive magnetic resonance techniques measuring the charge transport in electrolytic cells to identify such spin-dependent reactions and, on the way, you will learn a lot about photocatalysis, electrochemistry and electron spin resonance. This Master’s thesis might be particularly interesting for students fascinated by renewable energies and motivated to work at the intersection of physics and chemistry.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
Supervisor: Martin Brandt
Entanglement of two nuclear spins

Quantum 2.0 is often used to characterize quantum technologies based on entanglement. Unfortunately, there are scarcely few Fortgeschrittenenpraktrikumsversuche (FoPra) or Advanced Practical Training units (APT) which demonstrate entanglement. In this thesis, you will build such an experiment based on NV centers in diamond, entangling nuclear spins at room temperature. You will learn color center physics, optics, microwave engineering and state tomography to manipulate and read out the state of single electron and nuclear spins and to generate and quantify, yes, entanglement. The thesis should be an ideal combination of basic physics, some hardware work and software engineering, including the development of a GUI. (The thesis is subject to approval of the corresponding funds, which hopefully takes place in September.)

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Quantum Science & Technology
Supervisor: Martin Brandt
High-frequency microwave structures for quantum sensing
Manipulating spin states with microwave fields is at the heart of quantum technology. For quantum sensing applications, the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond has demonstrated unmatched capabilities to measure magnetic fields on the nanoscale. The applications of such unprecedented magnetic field sensors range from probing quantum materials to single-cell NMR microscopy. All sensing schemes developed rely on microwave pulses to manipulate the spin state of the NV center. However, in current magnetometers, only rather rudimentary methods to deliver the microwave are used, often limiting the power or the spectral range of the microwaves available at the NV center position. Further challenges include the limited space for instance when integrating magnetometers with microfluidics or cryostats. In this thesis, microwave structures in the frequency range from 2-12 GHz shall be designed, addressing these issues by developing innovative antennae and resonators which allow homogeneous high-power and broadband or tunable microwave delivery. You will use state-of the-art simulation software for the design of the systems, build selected structures and test them in a variety of magnetometer applications. Doing this, you will learn the fundamentals of the newest quantum sensing techniques and how to incorporate your designs into the most advanced magnetometers. The thesis will be co-supervised by Dominik Bucher from the Chemistry Department and Martin Brandt from the Schottky Institut (both at TUM) and will be conducted in close collaboration with a local company.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Quantum Science & Technology
Supervisor: Martin Brandt
Magnetic noise in superconducting quantum processors
A possible source of decoherence in superconducting qubits can be paramagnetic states which, however, are notoriously difficult to detect. We will use spin-dependent recombination and tunneling, highly sensitive methods to detect such states, to microscopically identify the dangling bonds present in state-of-the-art quantum processors and provide feedback to minimize their concentration during the different fabrication steps. We will further combine magnetic resonance experiments with capacitance-voltage characterization to obtain an understanding of the energetic position of the defects in the bandgap of the Si substrate. You will learn and expand advanced semiconductor characterization and electron spin resonance techniques and apply them to a problem of surprisingly high relevance for quantum computing.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Quantum Science & Technology
Supervisor: Martin Brandt
Optimisation of the microwave delivery for electrically detected magnetic resonance of NV centers in diamond
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Martin Brandt

Current and Finished Theses in the Group

Electrically Detected Magnetic Resonance in Arsenic-Doped Silicon Heterostructures and Nanobeams
Abschlussarbeit im Masterstudiengang Physics (Applied and Engineering Physics)
Themensteller(in): Martin Brandt
Processing and Optoelectronic Characterization of n-SiC-6H/p-GaN Nanowire Heterodiodes
Abschlussarbeit im Bachelorstudiengang Physik
Themensteller(in): Martin Stutzmann
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