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Prof. Dr. Franz Pfeiffer

Photo von Prof. Dr. Franz Pfeiffer.
Phone
+49 89 289-10827
+49 89 289-12551
Room
2093
E-Mail
franz.pfeiffer@tum.de
Links
Homepage
Page in TUMonline
Groups
Biomedical Physics
Institute of Radiology
Job Titles

Courses and Dates

Title and Module Assignment
ArtSWSLecturer(s)Dates
Biomedical Physics 1
eLearning course
Assigned to modules:
VO 2 Pfeiffer, F.
Assisstants: Schaff, F.
Thu, 12:00–13:30, MSB E.126
and singular or moved dates
Biomedical Physics 2
eLearning course
Assigned to modules:
VO 2 Pfeiffer, F. Wilkens, J.
Assisstants: Schaff, F.
Thu, 14:00–16:00, virtuell
and singular or moved dates
Chemistry in Biomedical Imaging for Physicists
eLearning course
Assigned to modules:
VO 2 Pfeiffer, F.
Assisstants: Busse, M.
Tue, 16:00–18:00, virtuell
Biomedical Physics
eLearning course
Assigned to modules:
HS 2 Pfeiffer, F.
Assisstants: Schaff, F.
singular or moved dates
Block Seminar on Current Research Topics in Biomedical Physics (E17 Seminar Week)
Assigned to modules:
HS 2 Herzen, J. Pfeiffer, F. Tue, 09:00–18:00, virtuell
Modern X-Ray Physics
eLearning course
Assigned to modules:
HS 2 Pfeiffer, F.
Assisstants: Achterhold, K.Dierolf, M.
Fri, 13:00–15:00, virtuell
and singular or moved dates
Seminar on Current Topics in BioEngineering (MSB Seminar)
Assigned to modules:
HS 2 Pfeiffer, F. Tue, 13:00–14:00, virtuell
Exercise to Chemistry in Biomedical Imaging for Physicists
Assigned to modules:
UE 1
Responsible/Coordination: Pfeiffer, F.
BEMP Lab 01: Clinical Computed Tomography
eLearning course course documents current information
Assigned to modules:
PR 4 Birnbacher, L. Hammel, J.
Responsible/Coordination: Pfeiffer, F.
Mon, 16:00–20:00
Mon, 16:00–20:00
and singular or moved dates
Current Research Topics in Biomedical Imaging (E17 Seminar)
Assigned to modules:
SE 2 Herzen, J. Pfeiffer, F. Thu, 11:00–12:30, virtuell
FOPRA Experiment 79: X-Ray Computed Tomography (AEP, BIO, KM, KTA)
course documents current information
Assigned to modules:
PR 1 Häusele, J. Viermetz, M.
Responsible/Coordination: Pfeiffer, F.
Revision Course to Biomedical Physics
Assigned to modules:
RE 2
Responsible/Coordination: Pfeiffer, F.
Revision Course to Block Seminar on Current Research Topics in Biomedical Physics (E17 Seminar Week)
Assigned to modules:
RE 2
Responsible/Coordination: Pfeiffer, F.
Revision Course to Modern X-Ray Physics
Assigned to modules:
RE 2
Responsible/Coordination: Pfeiffer, F.
Revision Course to Seminar on Current Topics in BioEngineering (MSB Seminar)
Assigned to modules:
RE 2
Responsible/Coordination: Pfeiffer, F.

Offered Bachelor’s or Master’s Theses Topics

Convolutional neural networks and transfer learning for artefacts reduction in X-ray dark-field CT

Grating-based X-ray dark-field (DF) imaging uses scattering of X-rays to create an image of an object, rather than conventional X-ray attenuation. The combination of X-ray scattering with imaging allows us to map information about structures that are much smaller than the resolution of the imaging system over a large field of view. X-ray dark-field imaging can be combined with computed tomography (CT) to create three-dimensional images of the scattering distribution inside an object.  DF-CT was recently implemented for the first time into a clinical CT here at TUM

(https://www.bioengineering.tum.de/en/news/details/new-technology-for-clinical-ct-scans).

The goal of this project is to use convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to remove sampling artefacts in DF-CT images. Due to the unavailability of training data from the DF-CT machine, a technologically similar experimental setup and apply transfer learning will be used. The student will acquire, process and prepare training data, as well as train and apply CNNs.

Character of thesis work: experimental lab work/ data acquisition (50%) & computational/ image processing (50%)

Basic experience in image processing, CNNs, and/or Python programming are desirable.

For more information, please contact: Dr. Florian Schaff (florian.schaff@tum.de), or Prof. Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de).

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
Convolutional neural networks and transfer learning for artefacts reduction in X-ray dark-field CT

Grating-based X-ray dark-field (DF) imaging uses scattering of X-rays to create an image of an object, rather than conventional X-ray attenuation. The combination of X-ray scattering with imaging allows us to map information about structures that are much smaller than the resolution of the imaging system over a large field of view. X-ray dark-field imaging can be combined with computed tomography (CT) to create three-dimensional images of the scattering distribution inside an object.  DF-CT was recently implemented for the first time into a clinical CT here at TUM

(https://www.bioengineering.tum.de/en/news/details/new-technology-for-clinical-ct-scans).

The goal of this project is to use convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to remove sampling artefacts in DF-CT images. Due to the unavailability of training data from the DF-CT machine, a technologically similar experimental setup and apply transfer learning will be used. The student will acquire, process and prepare training data, as well as train and apply CNNs.

Character of thesis work: experimental lab work/ data acquisition (50%) & computational/ image processing (50%)

Basic experience in image processing, CNNs, and/or Python programming are desirable.

For more information, please contact: Dr. Florian Schaff (florian.schaff@tum.de), or Prof. Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de).

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
Distortion correction for high-resolution quantitative X-ray imaging detectors

X-ray imaging detectors - in particular for high-resolution microscopy applications - may suffer from distortions, which degrade the image quality. This can have severe negative effects for quantitative applications, such as 3D micro-computed tomography. This project focuses on the characterisation of distortions of several X-ray imaging detectors at the Munich Compact Light Source, and the subsequent development of suitable correction methods.

Character of thesis work: mainly computational (image processing)  

For more information, please contact: Martin Dierolf (martin.dierolf@tum.de), Johannes Melcher (johannes.melcher@tum.de), or Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de)

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
Distortion correction for high-resolution quantitative X-ray imaging detectors

X-ray imaging detectors - in particular for high-resolution microscopy applications - may suffer from distortions, which degrade the image quality. This can have severe negative effects for quantitative applications, such as 3D micro-computed tomography. This project focuses on the characterisation of distortions of several X-ray imaging detectors at the Munich Compact Light Source, and the subsequent development of suitable correction methods.

Character of thesis work: mainly computational (image processing)  

For more information, please contact: Martin Dierolf (martin.dierolf@tum.de), Johannes Melcher (johannes.melcher@tum.de), or Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de)

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
High-sensitivity grating-based phase-contrast imaging at the Munich Compact Light Source - Computational Part

Using phase-contrast as alternative imaging contrast for X-rays can considerably improve the imaging results for biomedical specimens. This project will focus on the development of an algorithmic framework for a high-sensitivity and high-resolution grating-based phase-contrast micro-tomography setup at the Munich Compact Light Source for investigating soft-tissue biomedical samples, such biopsies. 

Character of thesis work: mainly computational (image processing/ reconstruction)  

For more information, please contact: Martin Dierolf (martin.dierolf@tum.de), Johannes Brantl (johannes.brantl@tum.de), or Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de)

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
High-sensitivity grating-based phase-contrast imaging at the Munich Compact Light Source - Computational Part

Using phase-contrast as alternative imaging contrast for X-rays can considerably improve the imaging results for biomedical specimens. This project will focus on the development of an algorithmic framework for a high-sensitivity and high-resolution grating-based phase-contrast micro-tomography setup at the Munich Compact Light Source for investigating soft-tissue biomedical samples, such biopsies. 

Character of thesis work: mainly computational (image processing/ reconstruction)  

For more information, please contact: Martin Dierolf (martin.dierolf@tum.de), Johannes Brantl (johannes.brantl@tum.de), or Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de)

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
High-sensitivity grating-based phase-contrast imaging at the Munich Compact Light Source - Experimental Part
Using phase-contrast as alternative imaging contrast for X-rays can considerably improve the imaging results for biomedical specimens. This project will focus on the experimental construction of a high-sensitivity and high-resolution grating-based phase-contrast micro-tomography setup at the Munich Compact Light Source for investigating soft-tissue biomedical samples, such as biopsies. Character of thesis work: mainly experimental For more information, please contact: Martin Dierolf (martin.dierolf@tum.de), Johannes Brantl (johannes.brantl@tum.de), or Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de)
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
High-sensitivity grating-based phase-contrast imaging at the Munich Compact Light Source - Experimental Part
Using phase-contrast as alternative imaging contrast for X-rays can considerably improve the imaging results for biomedical specimens. This project will focus on the experimental construction of a high-sensitivity and high-resolution grating-based phase-contrast micro-tomography setup at the Munich Compact Light Source for investigating soft-tissue biomedical samples, such as biopsies. Character of thesis work: mainly experimental For more information, please contact: Martin Dierolf (martin.dierolf@tum.de), Johannes Brantl (johannes.brantl@tum.de), or Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de)
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
Implementation of a grating-based interferometer for X-ray vector radiography at the Munich Compact Light Source

Grating-based X-ray dark-field (DF) imaging uses scattering of X-rays to create an image of an object, rather than conventional X-ray attenuation. The combination of X-ray scattering with imaging allows us to map information about structures that are much smaller than the resolution of the imaging system over a large field of view. The fact that the used gratings typically are one-dimensional can be leveraged to obtain an orientation dependent dark-field signal in a technique called X-ray vector radiography (XVR). Applications of XVR include the determination of the fibre orientation in reinforced composite materials, or characterization of the anisotropic structure in trabecular bones.

The goal of this project is to implement an experimental XVR setup at the Munich Compact Light Source (MuCLS - https://www.bioengineering.tum.de/en/central-building/munich-compact-light-source). The student will help with the design, implementation, and characterization of the X-ray grating interferometer setup, and conduct their own XVR experiments.

Character of thesis work: experimental lab work/ controls/ data acquisition (50%) & computational/ simulation/image processing (50%)

Basic experience in X-ray imaging, and/or Python programming are desirable.

For more information, please contact: Dr. Florian Schaff (florian.schaff@tum.de), or Prof. Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de).

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
Implementation of a grating-based interferometer for X-ray vector radiography at the Munich Compact Light Source

Grating-based X-ray dark-field (DF) imaging uses scattering of X-rays to create an image of an object, rather than conventional X-ray attenuation. The combination of X-ray scattering with imaging allows us to map information about structures that are much smaller than the resolution of the imaging system over a large field of view. The fact that the used gratings typically are one-dimensional can be leveraged to obtain an orientation dependent dark-field signal in a technique called X-ray vector radiography (XVR). Applications of XVR include the determination of the fibre orientation in reinforced composite materials, or characterization of the anisotropic structure in trabecular bones.

The goal of this project is to implement an experimental XVR setup at the Munich Compact Light Source (MuCLS - https://www.bioengineering.tum.de/en/central-building/munich-compact-light-source). The student will help with the design, implementation, and characterization of the X-ray grating interferometer setup, and conduct their own XVR experiments.

Character of thesis work: experimental lab work/ controls/ data acquisition (50%) & computational/ simulation/image processing (50%)

Basic experience in X-ray imaging, and/or Python programming are desirable.

For more information, please contact: Dr. Florian Schaff (florian.schaff@tum.de), or Prof. Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de).

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
Radioluminescence microscopy for organoid specimens

Radioluminescence microscopy (RLM) is a novel approach for high-resolution imaging of the radionuclide uptake in living cells, particularly in organoid systems. This project will focus on the development of an experimental setup, which allows imaging the radionuclide distribution with a few micro-meter resolution, using a scintillator-lens CCD system. This project will be carried out in collaboration with the department of nuclear medicine at the TUM university hospital Klinikum rechts der Isar.

Character of thesis work: experimental (50%) / computational (50%)

For more information, please contact: Martin Dierolf (martin.dierolf@tum.de), Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de)

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
Radioluminescence microscopy for organoid specimens

Radioluminescence microscopy (RLM) is a novel approach for high-resolution imaging of the radionuclide uptake in living cells, particularly in organoid systems. This project will focus on the development of an experimental setup, which allows imaging the radionuclide distribution with a few micro-meter resolution, using a scintillator-lens CCD system. This project will be carried out in collaboration with the department of nuclear medicine at the TUM university hospital Klinikum rechts der Isar.

Character of thesis work: experimental (50%) / computational (50%)

For more information, please contact: Martin Dierolf (martin.dierolf@tum.de), Franz Pfeiffer (franz.pfeiffer@tum.de)

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics
Supervisor: Franz Pfeiffer
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