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Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Peter Müller-Buschbaum

Photo von Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Peter Müller-Buschbaum.
Phone
+49 89 289-12451
+49 89 289-12458
+49 89 289-12459
+49 89 289-12460
+49 89 289-14704
Room
PH: 3278
E-Mail
muellerb@ph.tum.de
Links
Homepage
Page in TUMonline
Group
Functional Materials
Job Titles
  • Head of Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum
  • Full Professorship on Functional Materials
  • Head of Research Neutron Source FRM II
  • Office Functional Materials

Courses and Dates

Title and Module Assignment
ArtSWSLecturer(s)Dates
Polymer Physics 1
eLearning course course documents
Assigned to modules:
VO 2 Müller-Buschbaum, P.
Assisstants: Körstgens, V.
Tue, 10:00–12:00, PH II 127
Seminar on Neutrons in Research and Industry
current information
Assigned to modules:
PS 2 Märkisch, B. Morkel, C. Müller-Buschbaum, P. Pfleiderer, C.
Assisstants: Franz, C.Park, J.
Mon, 14:30–15:45, PH HS3
Exercise to Polymer Physics 1
eLearning course course documents
Assigned to modules:
UE 2
Responsible/Coordination: Müller-Buschbaum, P.
dates in groups
Current problems of organic photovoltaics
Assigned to modules:
SE 2 Müller-Buschbaum, P. Mon, 10:00–11:30, PH 3734
Lecturer's consulting hour to Polymer Physics I
Assigned to modules:
RE 2 Müller-Buschbaum, P. dates in groups
Edgar-Lüscher Lectures "Nuclear Physics"
This course is not assigned to a module.
WS 2 Müller-Buschbaum, P.
FOPRA Experiment 42: Atomic Force Microscopy
current information
Assigned to modules:
PR 1 Weindl, C.
Responsible/Coordination: Müller-Buschbaum, P.
FOPRA Experiment 61: Neutron Scattering at FRM II
current information
Assigned to modules:
PR 1 Georgii, R.
Responsible/Coordination: Müller-Buschbaum, P.
Visit of the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) for Students of Physics
current information
Assigned to modules:
EX 0.1
Responsible/Coordination: Müller-Buschbaum, P.
Seminar on polymers
Assigned to modules:
SE 2 Müller-Buschbaum, P. Papadakis, C. Wed, 13:15–15:00, PH 3734
Seminar on structure and dynamics of condensed matter
Assigned to modules:
SE 2 Müller-Buschbaum, P. Papadakis, C. Tue, 13:00–15:00, PH 3734

Offered Bachelor’s or Master’s Theses Topics

Organic Solar Cells for Space Applications
Organic solar cells have become a hot research topic in the last few years. The lightweight thin-film solar cells are of particular interest for space applications due to their exceptional power per mass, exceeding their inorganic counterparts by magnitudes. Recently, we performed the Organic and Hybrid Solar Cells In Space experiment (OHSCIS) and launched of organic solar cells to space for the first time. The mechanical and electronic design of the experiment aimed at maximizing the data collection rate and precise measurements. We showed that the organic solar cells operate in space conditions and produce reasonable power per area of up to 7 mW cm-2. Also during a phase being turned away from the sun, the solar cells produced power from collecting faint Sun-light scattered from Earth. Our results highlight the potential for near-Earth applications and deep space missions of these technologies. Soon a next space missing will come up and presently we are looking for an interested master student to join the exiting next flight of organic solar cells to space. The task will be to make new sets of organic solar cells and test them with the set-up. After the successful flight to space, the solar cell data need to be evaluated and analyzed in detail to learn from the space flight.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Peter Müller-Buschbaum
Perovskite Solar Cells for Space Applications
Perovskite solar cells have become a hot research topic in the last few years. The lightweight thin-film solar cells are of particular interest for space applications due to their exceptional power per mass, exceeding their inorganic counterparts by magnitudes. Recently, we performed the Organic and Hybrid Solar Cells In Space experiment (OHSCIS) and launched of perovskite solar cells to space for the first time. The mechanical and electronic design of the experiment aimed at maximizing the data collection rate and precise measurements. We showed that the perovskite solar cells operate in space conditions and produce reasonable power per area of up to 14 mW cm-2. Also during a phase being turned away from the sun, the solar cells produced power from collecting faint Sun-light scattered from Earth. Our results highlight the potential for near-Earth applications and deep space missions of these technologies. Soon a next space missing will come up and presently we are looking for an interested master student to join the exiting next flight of perovskite solar cells to space. The task will be to make new sets of perovskite solar cells and test them with the set-up. After the successful flight to space, the solar cell data need to be evaluated and analyzed in detail to learn from the space flight.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Peter Müller-Buschbaum
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