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Soft Matter Physics

Prof. Christine Papadakis

Research Field

The Soft Matter Physics Group investigates the structure, dynamics and kinetics of nanostructured polymer systems, e.g. amphiphilic and switchable block copolymers, thin polymer films, as well as polymers for medical applications. We mainly use scattering methods both at large facilities and in the lab.

Address/Contact

James-Franck-Str. 1/I
85748 Garching b. München

Members of the Research Group

Professor

Office

Scientists

Students

Other Staff

Teaching

Course with Participations of Group Members

Offers for Theses in the Group

Amphiphilic polymeric conetworks swell both in water and organic solvents. Using star block copolymers as building blocks, highly ordered gels with high toughness are obtained. In the proposed master thesis, the star block copolymers as well as the resulting conetworks shall be investigated in organic solvents using dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering. The candidate should be interested in experimental work as well as in data analysis and molecular interpretation.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Christine Papadakis
pH-responsive polymer micelles for drug delivery
In aqueous solution, amphiphilic block copolymers form core-shell micelles with the hydrophobic blocks forming the core and the hydrophilic blocks the shell. Such micelles find numerous applications for uptake, transport and release of hydrophobic substances. “Smart” systems may be created if the shell-forming block is pH-responsive, i.e. its degree of charge is controlled by pH. These can be used for the delivery of DNA. In the proposed master thesis, triblock terpolymers featuring a hydrophobic, a pH-responsive and a water-soluble block shall be studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering. The candidate should be interested in experimental work as well as in data analysis and molecular interpretation.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Christine Papadakis
Protein-based nanocarriers for drug delivery
Protein-based nanocarriers are of great interest for the encapsulation and release of hydrophobic bioactive substances, e.g. medical drugs, upon application of stimuli, such as ionic strength and pH. Such nanoparticles may be prepared from proteins and polyelectrolytes that form complexes by electrostatic interactions. By subsequent heating, the disulfide bonds between the proteins within the nanoparticles are stabilized. This preparation method yields robust nanoparticles that can swell or deswell upon changes of pH and ionic strength and retain the multifunctionality of the incorporated proteins. In the project proposed, the nanoparticles shall be characterized in terms of their size and internal morphology in dependence on the building blocks and upon change of pH or ionic strength. At this, a combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) will be used. The candidate should be interested in experimental work as well as in data analysis and molecular interpretation.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Christine Papadakis

Current and Finished Theses in the Group

Investigation of Long-term Reliability of Adhesive Joints under High-cyclic Loading in MEMS Devices
Abschlussarbeit im Masterstudiengang Physics (Applied and Engineering Physics)
Themensteller(in): Christine Papadakis
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