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Prof. Dr. techn. Stefan Filipp

Phone
+49 89 289-14201
Room
E-Mail
stefan.filipp@tum.de
Links
Page in TUMonline
Group
Technical Physics
Job Title
Professorship on Technical Physics

Courses and Dates

Title and Module Assignment
ArtSWSLecturer(s)Dates
Condensed Matter Physics 1
course documents
Assigned to modules:
VO 4 Filipp, S. Gross, R. Tue, 12:00–14:00, virtuell
Thu, 10:00–12:00, virtuell
Quantum Computing with Superconducting Qubits: architecture and algorithms
eLearning course
Assigned to modules:
VO 2 Filipp, S. Fri, 09:00–11:00, WMI 143
Superconducting Quantum Circuits
course documents virtual lecture hall
Assigned to modules:
PS 2 Deppe, F. Filipp, S.
Responsible/Coordination: Gross, R.
Assisstants: Fedorov, K.Marx, A.
Tue, 14:30–16:00, WMI 142
Exercise to Quantum Computing with Superconducting Qubits: architecture and algorithms
eLearning course
Assigned to modules:
UE 2
Responsible/Coordination: Filipp, S.
dates in groups
Mentoring in the Bachelor's Program Physics
Assigned to modules:
KO 0.2 Alim, K. Auwärter, W. Back, C. Bandarenka, A. Barth, J. … (insgesamt 48)
Responsible/Coordination: Höffer von Loewenfeld, P.
dates in groups
Quantum Entrepreneurship Laboratory
Assigned to modules:
SE 2 Filipp, S. Mendl, C. Pollmann, F.
Walther-Meißner-Seminar on Topical Problems of Low Temperature Physics
current information
Assigned to modules:
SE 2 Filipp, S. Gross, R. Fri, 11:00–12:30, WMI 143

Offered Bachelor’s or Master’s Theses Topics

Characterization and fabrication of superconducting multi-qubit devices

Superconducting quantum circuits form the basis of current quantum processing platforms that allow to run first algorithms. However, to make practical use of coherent quantum systems, there is considerable fundamental challenges ahead: overcoming decoherence of qubits caused by interactions with an uncontrolled environment, improving qubit control to avoid systematic errors, developing scalable multi-qubit architectures while maintaining high level of coherence, or the efficient generation of highly-entangled quantum states in quantum-classical hybrid schemes.

In this project, we plan to design and fabricate high-coherence superconducting microwave circuits (qubits and couplers) that allow for multi-qubit operations and therefore enhance the connectivity of a quantum processor. The characterization of these circuits in a cryogenic microwave measurement setup is an integral part of the project. The master project also consists of fabrication of the circuits using state-of-the-art micro- and nanofabrication techniques.

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Quantum Science & Technology
Supervisor: Stefan Filipp
Characterization of phase stability of synchronized vector signal generators

Realization of quantum computers consisting of a few tens of qubits has become a possibility in recent years. In order to do computations, quantum gates must be applied onto qubits. In the Q-Computing lab, qubits are realized using superconducting circuits and quantum gates are applied using microwave pulses. To generate microwave pulses we use In-phase and Quadrature (IQ) modulation where we use an IQ mixer to mix a continuous microwave tone generated by a microwave signal generator called Local Oscillator (LO) and external IQ signals generated by Arbitrary Waveform Generators(AWGs). In this setup correct timing (set by IQ signals) and phase synchronization(set by microwave tone) of multiple pulses applied to the same qubit and pulses applied to different qubits is necessary.  Lack of synchronization of pulses and phase instability of signal generator leads to errors in quantum gates and degrades the performance of a quantum computer. In this project you will characterize the phase stability of synchronized (microwave) vector signal generators with built in IQ mixing. You will learn about signal generation & noise in signal generators, IQ modulation, signal detection and analysis, thereby gaining a practical perspective on the challenges in operating a quantum computer.

suitable as
  • Bachelor’s Thesis Physics
Supervisor: Stefan Filipp
Development of a cryogenic microwave switch

The fabrication of powerful quantum computers is nowadays an accomplishable task. However, many fabrication procedures need to be developed and optimized in order to increase the quality of qubits. To optimize fabrication, a statistically significant amount of data must be obtained, which entails a large number of experiments. However, due to the limited number of devices and the long cooling time of the cryostat, this task becomes quite time-consuming. To increase the number of experiments, it is necessary to learn how to use the same instruments for different samples. For this, we need a microwave switch, to which we will develop a pulsed current source to reduce the heating of the cryostat during switching. During this project you will learn how to work with Arduino and  cryogenic devices and eventually learn how to measure superconducting quantum circuits.

suitable as
  • Bachelor’s Thesis Physics
Supervisor: Stefan Filipp
Shaping microwave signals for qubit control

Realization of quantum computers consisting of a few tens of qubits has become a possibility in recent years. In order to do computations, quantum gates must be applied onto qubits and qubit states must be readout. In the Q-Computing lab, qubits are realized using superconducting circuits and quantum gates are applied using microwave pulses. Moreover, the qubits can be readout(measured) using microwave pulses. To generate microwave pulses we use In-phase and Quadrature (IQ) modulation where we use an IQ mixer to mix a continuous microwave tone generated by a microwave signal generator called Local Oscillator (LO) and external IQ signals generated by Arbitrary Waveform Generators(AWGs). This is called up-conversion of a microwave tone. These pulses are then sent to the device situated in a dilution refrigerator. In order to complete the readout process we need to demodulate the readout signal which reflects from the device. For this we use down-conversion of reflected microwave pulse with the help of IQ mixers and LO, and extract IQ signals, which encode the information about qubit state. In this project you will implement both upconversion and downconversion using different IQ mixers and perform calibration of this process. You will learn about microwave pulse generation, IQ modulation, non-idealities in IQ mixers, signal detection and analysis. Therefore, you will gain a practical perspective on the challenges in operating a quantum computer.

suitable as
  • Bachelor’s Thesis Physics
Supervisor: Stefan Filipp
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