Research Groups at the Physics Department

Applied Quantum Field Theory

Our group focuses on the development and application of theoretical methods in the physics of strong interactions, the fundamental forces which are responsible for the inner structure of protons and neutrons as well as for the structure of nuclei. The basis of these investigations is Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD), the theory of the interaction of quarks and gluons. Part of this program is the investigation of the substructure of baryons and mesons as well as the explanation of the wealth of phenomena resulting from the collective interplay of these particles in nuclei.

Biomedical Physics (Prof. Franz Pfeiffer)

Our interdisciplinary research portfolio is focused on the translation of modern x-ray physics concepts to biomedical sciences and clinical applications. We are particularly interested in advancing conceptually new approaches for biomedical x-ray imaging and therapy. From a medical perspective, our work currently targets early cancer and osteoporosis diagnostics.

Biomolecular Nano-Technology (Prof. Hendrik Dietz)

We develop novel scientific devices and methods for applications in biomolecular physics, biological chemistry, and molecular medicine. To this end, we currently focus on using DNA as a programmable construction material for building nanometer-scale scientific devices with atomically precise features. We also customize proteins and create and study hybrid DNA-protein complexes. 3D transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and single molecule methods such as optical trapping and fluorescence microscopy are among our routine analysis tools.

Bio-Nano Technology and Bio-Electronics (Prof. Friedrich Simmel)

Our goal is the realization of self-organizing molecular systems that are able to respond to their environment, compute, move, take action.

Chemical Physics Beyond Equilibrium (Prof. Katharina Krischer)

We are working on topics falling into two different areas: Nonlinear Dynamics (e.g. Pattern Recognition, Pattern Formation during Si-Electrodissolution, Pattern Formation in Electrocatalytic Reactions, Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation) and Artificial Photosynthesis - Photoelectrochemistry.

Dense and Strange Hadronic Matter (Prof. Laura Fabbietti)

We experimentally investigate the properties of strange particles produced in heavy-ion and elementary reactions at intermediate beam energies. Our goal is to understand the interaction of particles which contain a strange quark with nucleons under different density and temperature conditions.

Experimental Physics with Cosmic Particles (Prof. Elisa Resconi)

In our group, astro- and particle physics, ground- and space-based experiments, photon and neutrino observations are combined in a scientific program in order to address the following questions: How do astrophysical accelerators work? Do neutrinos have non standard properties, beyond standard oscillation? What is the mass hierarchy of neutrinos? Is the proton stable? Where and what is dark matter?

Experimental Astro-Particle Physics (Prof. Stefan Schönert)

Our group is involved in a number of research projects in neutrino physics and dark matter research.

Experimental Astro-Particle Physics (Prof. Lothar Oberauer)

Our group is involved in a number of research projects on neutrino physics and dark matter research.

Experimental Semiconductor Physics (Prof. Martin Stutzmann)

Our work at the Walter Schottky Institut deals with various aspects of new and non conventional semiconductor materials and material combinations: semiconductors with a wide bandgap, disordered semiconductors, advanced thin film systems etc.

Functional Materials (Prof. Winfried Petry)

We examine the physical fundamentals of material properties using scattering methods (neutrons-, x-ray and dynamic light scattering). The general goal of our research is to jugde from the knowledge of the microscopic dynamics and structure for explaining the functional characteristics of condensed matter.

Hadronic Structure and Fundamental Symmetries (Prof. Stephan Paul)

Our group involved in a number of research projects dealing with high energy particle physics and neutron physics.

Semiconductor Nanostructures and Quantum Systems (Prof. Jonathan Finley)

Our group explores a wide range of topics related to the fundamental physics of nanostructured materials and their quantum-electronic and -photonic properties. We study the unique electronic, photonic and quantum properties of materials patterned over nanometer lengthscales and explore how sub-components can be integrated together to realise entirely new materials with emergent properties. This convergence of materials-nanotechnology, quantum electronics and photonics is strongly interdisciplinary, spanning topics across physics, materials science and engineering.

Laser and X-Ray Physics (Prof. Reinhard Kienberger)

Our group aims at investigating processes inside atoms and molecules on the shortest timescale reached so far, the attosecond timescale. One attosecond compares to one second like one second to the age of the universe. New insight into ever smaller microscopic units of matter as well as in ever faster evolving chemical, physical or atomic processes pushes the frontiers in many fields in science. The interest in these ultrashort processes is the driving force behind the development of sources and measurement techniques that allow time-resolved studies at ever shorter timescales.

Molecular Dynamics (Prof. Martin Zacharias)

The function of proteins and nucleic acids in living systems is strongly coupled to the molecular motion and dynamics of these biomolecules. Our group uses computer simulation methods to study the structure, function and dynamics of biomolecules. Our goal is to better understand structure formation processes and to elucidate the mechanism of ligand-receptor association in atomic detail.

Molecular Biophysics (Prof. Matthias Rief)

Proteins are fascinating examples of self-organized molecular machines. Without any help a polypeptide strand can fold into functional threedimensional structures. We are interested in studying the function and folding process of proteins on the single molecule level. Examples are single molecule folding/unfolding studies or the motility of molecular motors in optical traps.

Molecular Machines

Single molecule methods are essential for a thorough understanding of complex biological processes. They allow real time observation of molecular machines at work and their specific manipulation. Results of such experiments yield new insights into problems from fundamental physics at the nano-scale to the development of new drugs.

Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (Prof. Alexander Holleitner)

The Holleitner group investigates optoelectronic phenomena in nanoscale circuits with special focus on ultrafast optoelectronics, quantum optoelectronics, and excitonic systems. The research topics aim to fully exploit the potential of nanoscale circuits for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, as well as for communication and information technologies.

Neutron Scattering (Prof. Peter Böni)

Scientific activities covered by our group include the fundamental properties of magnetic and superconducting materials (bulk compounds and thin films), materials science and a few selected problems in particle physics. Our group has a long tradition in neutron related research, notably the development of state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques.

Nuclear Astrophysics (Prof. Shawn Bishop)

Our group works on a number of research projects on nuclear astrophysics, chemical evolution of the universe, as well as synthesis of nuclear physics, astronomy and stellar theory.

Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces (Prof. Johannes Barth)

Research at E20 aims at the fundamental understanding of interface phenomena and their control for the design of functional nanoarchitectures in reduced dimensions. We investigate and manipulate individual nano-objects and highly organized supramolecular systems.

Physics of Energy Conversion and Storage (Prof. Aliaksandr Bandarenka)

We conduct research in the area of the physics of energy conversion and storage. The main topics include the design and implementation of functional materials and a better understanding and characterization of electrified interfaces. The material design is based on a bottom-up approach using input from electrochemical surface science and starting from model surfaces.

Physics of Hadrons and Nuclei (Prof. Stefan Schönert)

Kernspektroskopie und Angewandte Kernphysik: Durch hochauflösende Spektroskopie von Kernen ist es möglich Rückschlüsse auf die effektiven Wechselwirkungen im Kern zu erhalten. Dabei untersuchen wir meist Kerne unter extremen Bedingungen, um verschiedene Komponenten der Wechselwirkung zu studieren. Unsere Gruppe beschäftigt sich auch mit der Entwicklung und Nutzung von kernphysikalischen Methoden für andere Gebiete, wie zum Beispiel der Astrophysik und der Materialanalyse.

Soft Matter Physics (Prof. Christine Papadakis)

The Soft Matter Physics Group investigates the structure, dynamics and kinetics of nanostructured polymer systems, e.g. amphiphilic and switchable block copolymers, thin polymer films, as well as polymers for medical applications. We mainly use scattering methods both at large facilities and in the lab.

Physics of Functional Layers (Prof. Dirk Grundler)

De Haas-van Alphen-Effekt, Streufeld-Verteilung, Spintronics, Magnetisierungsdynamik, Mikromagnetische Simulation, EMR- und Hall-Sensoren, Magnonics

Plasma Surface and Divertor Physics (Prof. Ulrich Stroth)

We represent at the TUM the wide field of plasma physics in research and teaching. The focus of our work lies on magnetized high-temperature plasmas as they exist in fusion experiments as well as in the universe. Of special interest for our research are processes relevant for developing a future energy source based on fusion reactions in magnetically confined plasmas.

Engineering Physics (Prof. Rudolf Gross)

The research activities of the Walther-Meißner-Institute are focused on low temperature solid-state and condensed matter physics. The research program is devoted to both fundamental and applied research and also addresses materials science, thin film and nanotechnology aspects.

Particle Physics with Neutrons (Prof. Peter Fierlinger)

Our research deals with experiments that should help to understand properties of the early Universe. We currently focus on the nature of the excess of matter versus antimatter. In most scenarios that describe this so-called baryogenesis, new sources of broken symmetries in the early Universe are required. Electric dipole moments (EDM) of fundamental quantum systems are interesting systems to investigate such new sources of CP (or T) violation in the baryon-sector, beyond the Standard Model of particle physics (SM).

Theoretical Biophysics of Neuronal Information Processing (Prof. J. Leo van Hemmen)

Our basic research goal is to understand the basic units of information processing in the brain. In order to explore the underlying universal principles we focus on sensory systems in the animal world. We search for systems that are on the one hand simple enough to allow a thorough understanding of the system, but on the other hand complex enough to show interesting behavior. In this way, we try to identify fundamental processes that underlying information processing in the brain. Experimental verifiability always plays an important role in our research and we prefer to work together with experimentalists to get an optimal understanding of the problems we are dealing with.

Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (Prof. Alejandro Ibarra)

The Standard Model of Particle Physics provides an excellent description of nature at distances larger than E-16 cm, or equivalently energies smaller than 100 GeV. However, there are reasons to believe that the Standard Model is incomplete and needs to be extended. Our research group considers extensions of the Standard Model that might account for these observations and we study their consequences for present and future experiments.

Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (Prof. Martin Beneke)

Our research is in theoretical particle physics. We are interested in high-energy collider phenomenology, perturbative loop calculations, searches for physics beyond the Standard Model and the phenomenology of the Standard Model, the physics of heavy quarks (bottom, top), CP violation, strong interaction physics and some aspects of cosmology/dark matter.

Theoretical Solid State Physics

How small can a computer, a circuit, a transistor, or a laser be made? Can one design electronic nano-switches that consume no power? How fast can we communicate information inside of a device? How much information can we store on a square nanometer? How do atoms behave when we arrange them in chains, rings, nets, clusters, pyramids, doughnuts? What happens when....

Theoretical Physics of the Early Universe (Prof. Björn Garbrecht)

The cosmic evolution depends sensitively on initial conditions, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry, the Dark Matter abundance and density perturbations, that eventually grow into galaxies. Understanding the initial conditions is one of the key motivations for exploring Physics beyond the Standard Model. Cosmology thus complements laboratory experiments such as the Large Hadron Collider. The particular research interests of our group encompass the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry and of density perturbations from inflation.

Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology (Prof. Michael Ratz)

Extensions of the standard model of particle physics, e.g. unified theories and higher-dimensional theories, supersymmetry, supergravity and string phenomenology and neutrinos. Early universe, cosmology and astro-particle physics, e.g. general aspects and in the supersymmetric context.

Theoretical Particle and Nuclear Physics (Prof. Nora Brambilla)

Effective Quantum Field Theories (EFTs) are the state-of-the-art tools for analyzing physical systems that contain many different energy or momentum scales. Such systems are the rule, rather than the exception, from the "high"-energy domain of Particle Physics to the "low"-energy domain of Nuclear Physics.

Soft Matter Theory (Prof. Alessio Zaccone)

Using statistical mechanics, we investigate the role of molecular-level interactions and structural order (or disorder) on the phase behaviour (e.g. liquid-to-solid transitions) and macroscopic properties of complex condensed matter systems, such as colloids, functional materials, amorphous metals and polymers, and self-assembled biomolecules.

Theory of Complex Bio-Systems (Prof. Ulrich Gerland)

In physics, interactions between particles follow laws. In biology, interactions between biomolecules serve a function. We study the physics of biological functions. In particular, we are interested in cases where the implementations of biological functions are constrained by physical principles. Methods from statistical physics help to describe the functioning of complex biomolecular systems on a coarse-grained, but quantitative level.

Topology of Correlated Systems (Prof. Christian Pfleiderer)

Scientific activities covered at our institute include the fundamental properties of magnetic and superconducting materials (bulk compounds and thin films), materials science and a few selected problems in particle physics. The institute has a long tradition in neutron related research, notably the development of state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques.

Many Particle Phenomena (Prof. Wilhelm Zwerger)

Research in the theory group led by Prof. Wilhelm Zwerger is focused on quantum and statistical physics in a wide range of areas, from condensed matter physics and nanostructures to ultracold gases and the interface between quantum optics and solid state physics. We are working in collaboration with a number of groups in the Munich area and beyond, in particular with the Max-Planck-Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) and within the Nano-Inititative Munich (NIM).

Cellular Biophysics (Prof. Andreas Bausch)

Understanding complex biomaterials on a fundamental physical basis is an integral challenge of future biophysical research. This challenge can be addressed by the concerted application of new experimental tools of soft condensed matter physics to living cells and bio-mimetic model systems. In our group we concentrate on the one hand on developing new physical tools to address the underlying complexity and mechanisms and on the other hand on developing new biomaterials for applications ranging from biomedicine to functional food.

Condensed Matter Physics

When atoms interact things can get interesting. Fundamental research on the underlying properties of materials and nanostructures and exploration of the potential they provide for applications.

Nuclear, Particle and Astrophysics

A journey of discovery to understanding our world at the subatomic scale, from the nuclei inside atoms down to the most elementary building blocks of matter. Are you ready for the adventure?

Biophysics

Biological systems, from proteins to living cells and organisms, obey physical principles. Our research groups in biophysics shape one of Germany's largest scientific clusters in this area.