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PD Dr. rer. nat. habil. Frank Eisenhauer

Photo von PD  Dr. rer. nat. habil. Frank Eisenhauer.
Phone
+49 0 89 30000-3563
Room
E-Mail
frank.eisenhauer@mytum.de
Links
Homepage
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Group
Max-Planck-Institue for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE)
Job Title
PD at the Physics Department

Courses and Dates

Offered Bachelor’s or Master’s Theses Topics

Confinement of charged nanoparticles: Quadrupole Ion Trap - particle detection
Charged particles trapping and isolation, originally started in fundamental physics some 60 years ago, has nowadays numerous applications with interdisciplinary impact from astrophysics to biology. In laboratory astrophysics, ion traps are one of the few instruments allowing studies at conditions approaching those in the interstellar medium, where low temperatures (tens of K) and number densities (<10^10 cm^-3) prevail. In this project the main goal is to develop an detection system for a charged and trapped nanoparticles of sizes ~500 nm in an cryogenic quadrupole ion trap. This is an experimental physics project, the participant will work to integrate the hardware (laser, detector, DAq) together with customised software in order to accomplish the task. This project will offer a deep insight into photon detection using APD (avalanche-photodiode), signal filtering and processing using Fourier transforms and data acquisition using customized hardware. Contact: Dr. Pavol Jusko Prof. Paola Caselli
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Nuclear, Particle, and Astrophysics
Supervisor: Frank Eisenhauer
Galactic cosmic rays and their interaction with astrophysical objects

The Centre for astrochemical Studies (CAS) group at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics includes experts in observations (millimetre and sub-millimetre single dish and interferometry, radio and infrared telescopes), theory (physical processes and dynamics, gas-grain chemical processes and dust evolution, molecular astrophysics and collisional/rate coefficients), and the laboratory (focusing on spectroscopic studies of molecules of astrophysical interest). The combination of observations, theory and laboratory work is crucial to study the physical/chemical structure of an astrophysical object.

We offer Master Thesis projects on the theoretical analysis of propagation and penetration of low-energy (Galactic) cosmic rays into molecular clouds and circumstellar disks. The aim of the work is to identify and understand the principal mechanisms that govern these processes, and to analyze the impact of cosmic rays on a variety of physical and chemical phenomena occurring in clouds and disks. Certain background in the physical kinetics is desirable.

Contacts: PD Dr. Alexei Ivlev:  ivlev@mpe.mpg.de


suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Nuclear, Particle, and Astrophysics
Supervisor: Frank Eisenhauer
High resolution molecular spectroscopy in the laboratory and in space

The Centre for astrochemical Studies (CAS) group at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics includes experts in observations (millimetre and sub-millimetre single dish and interferometry, radio and infrared telescopes), theory (physical processes and dynamics, gas-grain chemical processes and dust evolution, molecular astrophysics and collisional/rate coefficients), and the laboratory (focusing on spectroscopic studies of molecules of astrophysical interest). The combination of observations, theory and laboratory work is crucial to study the physical/chemical structure of an astrophysical object. 

We offer Master Thesis projects on the analysis of single dish and/or interferometric data on star-forming regions in the mm- and sub-mm spectral region. The aim of the project is to obtain, through the information carried by molecular spectra, insights on the physical and chemical processes governing the earliest stages of star formation. Some background in astrophysics is advantageous.


We also offer Master thesis projects on the spectroscopy of molecules of astrophysical interest. The student will have the opportunity to work with several state-of-the-art experiments such as a sub-millimetre free-unit jet. The thesis project will be mainly focused on the acquisition and analysis of spectra that will help the identification of new molecules in the interstellar medium. There will also be the possibility to participate to the further development of the experiment. Some background in molecular spectroscopy is advantageous.

Contacts:
Prof. Paola Caselli  caselli@mpe.mpg.de
Dr. Silvia Spezzano  spezzano@mpe.mpg.de

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Nuclear, Particle, and Astrophysics
Supervisor: Frank Eisenhauer
Studying the chemical signature of protostellar binary interactions through simulations

More than half of the stars forms in multiple systems. The dynamical interactions between the multiple stars can have a profound influence on the formation and evolution of stars and planets. This, however, is not well understood, especially at the early stages of star formation, due to the difficulty of observing young stars obscured by its surrounding natal cloud. Recent high-resolution ALMA (the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) observations have spatially resolved the emission from complex organic molecules around a very young protostellar binary system [1], also constraining the stellar masses and orbital parameters. The emission from these molecules coincides with features seen in the dust around the binary accretion disks, possibly corresponding to spirals or tightly wound structures. These features are difficult to explain if the emission arises solely due to heating from the forming protostars, the most common scenario used to explain the appearance of warm complex organic molecule emission around protostars. We propose to investigate the role of shocks created by the binary interactions in the production and distribution of molecular tracers at scales from a few up to 100 astronomical units. Gravitational forces from the binary stars can create shocks in the disk surrounding them. Detailed numerical simulations will be needed to investigate the temperature and density structure created by the interaction. This study will shed light on how the binary interactions can influence the chemical inventory in multiple systems at planet formation scales. During this master project, the student will carry out 3D hydrodynamical simulations with the orbital and gas properties observed in the protostellar binary [2]. Detailed thermo-dynamics will be built to investigate the origin of the high temperature and density tracers seen in the gas phase towards this embedded binary system. The student will analyze the spirals or other types of shocks features formed in the simulations, and how it depends on the numerical and physical parameters.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in programming (C/C++ and Python will be used).

Contact: Dr. Munan Gong <munan@mpe.mpg.de>, Dr. Maria Jose Maureira <maureira@mpe.mpg.de>, Prof. Dr. Paola Caselli <caselli@mpe.mpg.de>

[1] Maureira et el. 2020, "Orbital and Mass Constraints of the Young Binary System IRAS 16293-2422 A". The Astrophysical Journal 897.

[2] Moody et al. 2019, "Hydrodynamic Torques in Circumbinary Accretion Disks", The Astrophysical Journal 875.

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Nuclear, Particle, and Astrophysics
Supervisor: Frank Eisenhauer
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