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Dr. rer. nat. Raimund Strauß

Phone
Room
E-Mail
raimund.strauss@mytum.de
Links
Homepage
Page in TUMonline
Group
Experimental Astro-Particle Physics
Job Title
TUM Junior Fellow

Courses and Dates

Offered Bachelor’s or Master’s Theses Topics

Characterization of Superconducting Connectors for the NUCLEUS Experiment
The detection of coherent-neutrino nucleus scattering (CEvNS) opens a new window to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos and to probe physics beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics. NUCLEUS is a novel cryogenic neutrino experiment at a nuclear power reactor which allows for precision measurements of CEvNS at unprecedentedly low energies. It is based on recently demonstrated ultra-low threshold cryogenic detectors being developed at TUM. Accessing energies in the 10eV regime enables to fully exploit the strongly enhanced cross section of CEvNS which leads to a miniaturization of neutrino detectors. The NUCLEUS collaboration consists of 5 institutes in Germany, France, Italy and Austria and is fully funded. The experiment will be installed at a new experimental site at the CHOOZ nuclear power plant in France. In the framework of this thesis, students can directly contribute to the development of the NUCLEUS cryogenic detector at the TUM labs. This work will focus on the characterization of the superconducting cables and connectors of the main component of NUCLEUS, the cryogenic detector. The Bachelor student will be involved in: - Precision resistance measurements at cryogenic temperatures (mK) - Operation of state-of-the-art cryostats - High-frequency signal processing and analysis - Basic signal analysis Students will be guided to the operation of the device in the laboratory, to perform dedicated measurement campaigns and to analyse the data recorded. A background in basic programming is welcome, but not mandatory. For more information please check https://www.moodle.tum.de/course/view.php?id=75320
suitable as
  • Bachelor’s Thesis Physics
Supervisor: Raimund Strauß
Cryogenic Properties of Detector Materials for the NUCLEUS Experiment
The detection of coherent-neutrino nucleus scattering (CEvNS) opens a new window to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos and to probe physics beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics. NUCLEUS is a novel cryogenic neutrino experiment at a nuclear power reactor which allows for precision measurements of CEvNS at unprecedentedly low energies. It is based on recently demonstrated ultra-low threshold cryogenic detectors being developed at TUM. Accessing energies in the 10eV regime enables to fully exploit the strongly enhanced cross section of CEvNS which leads to a miniaturization of neutrino detectors. The NUCLEUS collaboration consists of 5 institutes in Germany, France, Italy and Austria and is fully funded. The experiment will be installed at a new experimental site at the CHOOZ nuclear power plant in France. In the framework of this thesis, the cryogenic properties of detector materials are investigated. This work will focus on the measurement of the heat capacities of different crystalline and plastic scintillator materials, which values are widely unknown and of high interest for the NUCLEUS experiment as well as for the scientific community. The results are expected to lead to a scientific publication on the topic. The Bachelor student will be mainly involved in: * Development of a device for heat capacity 
measurements 
 *  Setting up and performing measurements in a 
cryostat 
 * Analysis of the taken data Students will be guided to the operation of the dilution refrigerator cryostats at TUM , to preform heat capacity measurement campaigns and to analyse the data recorded. A background in basic programming is welcome, but not mandatory. For more information please check https://www.moodle.tum.de/course/view.php?id=75320
suitable as
  • Bachelor’s Thesis Physics
Supervisor: Raimund Strauß
Development of novel X-ray fluorescence sources for Dark Matter and neutrino experiments
Searches for light Dark Matter and studies of coherent neutrino scattering (CEvNS) requires a precise understanding of the detector response at energies as low as a few tens of 10eV. In our research group at TUM we are involved in the CRESST experiment for direct Dark Matter Search at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy and the NUCLEUS experiment for the exploration of CEvNS, to be installed at the CHOOZ nuclear power plant in France. In the framework both projects were are developing innovative calibration sources based on X-ray florescence. X-ray photons from well-known sources (e.g. Fe-55) are irradiated on different target materials consisting of light elements. The subsequent de-excitation of discrete energy levels in the target materials lead to characteristic low-energy X-ray emission which can be used to calibrate the low energy regime of our detectors. While the proof-of-concept of this project has been achieved, the group at E15 is currently working on an optimization, miniaturization and on applications of these novel calibration sources. In the framework of this Bachelor thesis, the student will perform a dedicated simulation baaed on an existing GEANT4 Monte-Carlo toolkit and then optimize the sources in terms of X-ray yield and energy. In a second step, the optimized source will be build and operated in the dedicated detector setup being installed at TUM. Students will be introduced to the basics of Monte-Carlo simulations and X-ray florescence, and to will be guided to perform X-ray measurements at TUM and to analyse the data recorded. A background in basic programming is welcome, but not mandatory. For more information please check https://www.moodle.tum.de/course/view.php?id=75320
suitable as
  • Bachelor’s Thesis Physics
Supervisor: Raimund Strauß
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