de | en

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Marc Tornow

Photo von Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Marc Tornow.
Phone
+49 89 289-23101
Room
0108.01.818
E-Mail
tornow@tum.de
Links
Homepage
Page in TUMonline
Group
Associate Professorship of Molekularelektronik (Prof. Tornow)
Job Titles
  • Specific field Molekularelektronik (Department of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering)
  • Professor associated with the Physics Department

Courses and Dates

Title and Module Assignment
ArtSWSLecturer(s)Dates
Solid State, Semiconductor and Device Physics This course is not assigned to a module.
VI 7 Chryssikos, D. Reiser, D. Tornow, M.
Assisstants: Hutschenreiter, R.
Nanotechnology This course is not assigned to a module.
VI 3 Speckbacher, M. Tornow, M.
Assisstants: Chryssikos, D.Dlugosch, J.Hutschenreiter, R.
Seminar Nanoelectronics This course is not assigned to a module.
HS 2 Becherer, M. Tornow, M.
Assisstants: Haider, M.Hutschenreiter, R.Kamiyama, T.Leistner, H.
Doktorandenseminar This course is not assigned to a module.
SE 2 Tornow, M.
Electronically Functional Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films This course is not assigned to a module.
SE 2 Reiser, D. Tornow, M.
Assisstants: Chryssikos, D.Dlugosch, J.Hutschenreiter, R.Kamiyama, T.Leistner, H. … (insgesamt 6)
Memristive Devices Laboratory This course is not assigned to a module.
PR 5 Reiser, D. Tornow, M.
Assisstants: Chryssikos, D.Dlugosch, J.Speckbacher, M.

Offered Bachelor’s or Master’s Theses Topics

Protein self-assembly and electrical characterization for bioelectronic nanodevices

Description
Electronic devices are nowadays getting increasingly integrated into biological systems,
making biomolecules, such as proteins, "talk" to solid-state electrodes. Progress in
nanofabrication enables ever smaller devices, ultimately probing single biomolecules. In this
context, elucidating the charge transport mechanisms within biomolecules and electronic
coupling to the contacts constitutes a major research challenge. In the search for a reliable
testbed, we will employ chemical self-assembly to immobilize proteins on conductive surfaces
and investigate the feasibility of an electrical top contact. The results of this project will serve
as the first step towards the realization of prototype protein-based nanodevices in view of future
bioelectronics applications.

Tasks
- Chemical modification of conductive surfaces with organic linker molecules.
- Immobilization of bacteriorhodopsin and other protein molecules on the modified
surfaces via self-assembly.
- Characterization of the above via atomic force microscopy, spectral ellipsometry, and
contact angle measurements.
- Fabrication of electrical top contacts (e.g., eutectic gallium-indium) and electrical
measurements.
- Electrical data analysis and modelling, charge transport mechanism study.

Requirements
- M.Sc. student in electrical engineering, physics, or similar.
- High interest in experimental research and molecular electronics. Related laboratory
experience will be of advantage.
- Independent and methodical work style.
- Very good English skills.

Contact
Domenikos Chryssikos, dom.chryssikos@tum.de
Prof. Dr. Marc Tornow, tornow@tum.de

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Marc Tornow
Top of page