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Experimental Astro-Particle Physics

Prof. Stefan Schönert

Research Field

Neutrino Physics

  • LENA - Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy
  • Borexino
  • DoubleChooz
  • CNNS - Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering
  • GERDA - Search for neutrino-less double beta decay

Dark Matter Search

  • CRESST - Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers
  • CRESST Scattering Experiment at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratorium
  • EURECA - European Dark Matter Search
  • Experiments on liquified rare gases

Address/Contact

James-Franck-Str. 1/I
85748 Garching b. München
e15office@ph.tum.de
+49 89 289 12522
Fax: +49 89 289 12680

Members of the Research Group

Professor

Office

Scientists

Students

Other Staff

Teaching

Course with Participations of Group Members

Titel und Modulzuordnung
ArtSWSDozent(en)Termine
Einführung in die Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik
eLearning-Kurs
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
VO 2 Schönert, S. einzelne oder verschobene Termine
Übungen zu Einführung in die wissenschaftliche Programmierung (IN8008)
LV-Unterlagen
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
UE 2 Menhorn, F. Milbradt, R. Obersteiner, M.
Leitung/Koordination: Neckel, T.
Mitwirkende: Berger, D.Chryssos, L.Rogge, C.
Termine in Gruppen
Übung zu Einführung in die Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik
eLearning-Kurs
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
UE 2 Strauß, R.
Leitung/Koordination: Schönert, S.
Termine in Gruppen
Current Topics in Astro-Particle Physics
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
SE 2 Oberauer, L. Schönert, S. einzelne oder verschobene Termine
FOPRA Experiment 56: Cosmic Messengers: Catch Cosmic Rays with Silicon Photomultipliers (AEP, KM, KTA)
LV-Unterlagen
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
PR 1 Vogl, C.
Leitung/Koordination: Schönert, S.
FOPRA-Versuch 02: Messung der Radonkonzentration in Raumluft (AEP, KTA)
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
PR 1 Comellato, T.
Leitung/Koordination: Schönert, S.
Neutrinos and Dark Matter in Astro- and Particle Physics Colloquy
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
KO 2 Majorovits, B. Mertens, S. Resconi, E. Schönert, S. Weiler, A.
Vorbesprechung zum Fortgeschrittenen-Praktikum (F-Praktikum)
eLearning-Kurs aktuelle Informationen
Zuordnung zu Modulen:
OV 0.1 Schönert, S. Sharp, I. einzelne oder verschobene Termine

Offers for Theses in the Group

CRESST: Freezing cold, deep underground, illuminating the dark (matter)

The CRESST (Cryogenic Rare-Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) experiment operated at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory employs highly sensitive cryogenic detectors to the search for signals of the elusive dark matter particles, a main ingredient of the Universe whose nature is still unknown. 

The energy thresholds reached in CRESST-III are the lowest in the field, making CRESST the most sensitive experiment to light dark matter. Optimisation of the tungsten thin-film thermometers and of the techniques for data analysis promise will further improve the energy threshold, which will significantly boost the physics reach of the experiment.

 

A student can contribute to:

- design, production and prototyping of new CRESST detectors in Munich 

- development of high purity crystals 

- development of new software tools for data analysis

- dark matter data analysis

 

and, if interested, can participate in the operation of the main experiment at Gran Sasso. 

 

The theses can be carried out at the Chair for astroparticle physics of the Physics Department and/or at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics (MPP). Supervision at the Physics Deptartment by Prof. Schönert / Dr. Strauss and at the MPP by Prof. Schönert /  Dr. Federica Petricca. Please contact schoenert@ph.tum.de, raimund.strauss@ph.tum.de and petricca@mpp.mpg.de for further information. 

 

We will organize a dedicated meeting for interested (bachelor) students on Tuesday, February 1, 14:00-16:00. For more information please check https://www.moodle.tum.de/course/view.php?id=75320 . Also Master students are welcome to join the meeting.

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Nuclear, Particle, and Astrophysics
Supervisor: Stefan Schönert
CRESST: Freezing cold, deep underground, illuminating the dark (matter)

The CRESST (Cryogenic Rare-Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) experiment operated at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory employs highly sensitive cryogenic detectors to the search for signals of the elusive dark matter particles, a main ingredient of the Universe whose nature is still unknown. 

The energy thresholds reached in CRESST-III are the lowest in the field, making CRESST the most sensitive experiment to light dark matter. Optimisation of the tungsten thin-film thermometers and of the techniques for data analysis promise will further improve the energy threshold, which will significantly boost the physics reach of the experiment.

 

A student can contribute to:

- design, production and prototyping of new CRESST detectors in Munich 

- development of high purity crystals 

- development of new software tools for data analysis

- dark matter data analysis

 

and, if interested, can participate in the operation of the main experiment at Gran Sasso. 

 

The theses can be carried out at the Chair for astroparticle physics of the Physics Department and/or at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics (MPP). Supervision at the Physics Deptartment by Prof. Schönert / Dr. Strauss and at the MPP by Prof. Schönert /  Dr. Federica Petricca. Please contact schoenert@ph.tum.de, raimund.strauss@ph.tum.de and petricca@mpp.mpg.de for further information. 

 

We will organize a dedicated meeting for interested (bachelor) students on Tuesday, February 1, 14:00-16:00. For more information please check https://www.moodle.tum.de/course/view.php?id=75320 . Also Master students are welcome to join the meeting.

suitable as
  • Bachelor’s Thesis Physics
Supervisor: Stefan Schönert
LEGEND: Why does matter prevail over antimatter in today's Universe?

Neutrinos were discovered in 1956, but only at the turn of the millennium was it experimentally proven that the three known neutrino types can convert into one another. These flavor oscillations are possible only if neutrinos have nonzero mass, which is currently the only established contradiction to the standard model (SM) of particle physics.

 

From tritium beta decay experiments and cosmological observations, we know that their masses are very small—less than 10^{-5} of the electron mass. Neutrinos are the only fundamental spin-1/2 particles (fermions) without electric charge. As a consequence, they might be Majorana fermions, particles identical to their antiparticles.

 

This is a key ingredient for the explanation for why matter is so much more abundant than antimatter in today’s Universe and why neutrinos are so much lighter than the other elementary particles.

 

Majorana neutrinos would lead to nuclear decays that violate lepton number conservation and are therefore forbidden in the Standard Model of particle physics. The so-called neutrinoless double-beta (0nbb) decay simultaneously transforms two neutrons inside a nucleus into two protons with the emission of two electrons. The LEGEND-200 experiment, currently under commissioning at the Italian Gran Sasso underground laboratory aims to be the first experiment to probe half-lives beyond 1E27 years.

 

We offer the opportunity to carry out exciting experimental BSc (and MSc) theses with a focus on:

- liquid argon detector development: SiPMs, VUV light detection and wavelength shifting, xenon-doping, trace analysis;

- germanium detectors: detector design, modeling of signal generation, pulse shape analysis, surface event discrimination;

- new software tools and algorithms: classical techniques, machine learning methods;

- data analysis: rare line searches, exotic decays, time and spatial coincidence searches;

- Monte Carlo simulations: light propagation and detection in liquid argon, gamma rays from radioactive decays, isotope production deep underground by cosmic rays;

 

and, if interested, can participate in the operation of the main experiment at Gran Sasso. 

 

You would be fully integrated into the research team and would work closely together with our international partners.

 

The theses can be carried out at the Chair for astroparticle physics of the Physics Department. Supervision at the Physics Deptartment by Prof. Schönert and his team. Please contact schoenert@ph.tum.de for further information. 

 

We will organize a dedicated meeting for interested bachelor students on Tuesday, February 1, 14:00-16:00. For more information please check https://www.moodle.tum.de/course/view.php?id=75320 . Also Master students are welcome to join.

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Nuclear, Particle, and Astrophysics
Supervisor: Stefan Schönert
LEGEND: Why does matter prevail over antimatter in today's Universe?

<p>Neutrinos were discovered in 1956, but only at the turn of the millennium was it experimentally proven that the three known neutrino types can convert into one another. These flavor oscillations are possible only if neutrinos have nonzero mass, which is currently the only established contradiction to the standard model (SM) of particle physics. <o:p></o:p></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> From tritium beta decay experiments and cosmological observations, we know that their masses are very small—less than 10^{-5} of the electron mass. Neutrinos are the only fundamental spin-1/2 particles (fermions) without electric charge. As a consequence, they might be Majorana fermions, particles identical to their antiparticles. <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> This is a key ingredient for the explanation for why matter is so much more abundant than antimatter in today’s Universe and why neutrinos are so much lighter than the other elementary particles. <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> Majorana neutrinos would lead to nuclear decays that violate lepton number conservation and are therefore forbidden in the Standard Model of particle physics. The so-called neutrinoless double-beta (0nbb) decay simultaneously transforms two neutrons inside a nucleus into two protons with the emission of two electrons. The LEGEND-200 experiment, currently under commissioning at the Italian Gran Sasso underground laboratory aims to be the first experiment to probe half-lives beyond 1E27 years. <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> We offer the opportunity to carry out exciting experimental BSc (and MSc) theses with a focus on:<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> - liquid argon detector development: SiPMs, VUV light detection and wavelength shifting, xenon-doping, trace analysis; </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> - germanium detectors: detector design, modeling of signal generation, pulse shape analysis, surface event discrimination; <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> - new software tools and algorithms: classical techniques, machine learning methods; <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> - data analysis: rare line searches, exotic decays, time and spatial coincidence searches; <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> - Monte Carlo simulations: light propagation and detection in liquid argon, gamma rays from radioactive decays, isotope production deep underground by cosmic rays; <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US">and, if interested, can participate in the operation of the main experiment at Gran Sasso. <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p>

<p>You would be fully integrated into the research team and would work closely together with our international partners. <o:p></o:p></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> The theses can be carried out at the Chair for astroparticle physics of the Physics Department. Supervision at the Physics Deptartment by Prof. Schönert and his team. Please contact schoenert@ph.tum.de for further information. <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: medium; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif;"><span lang="EN-US"> We will organize a dedicated meeting for interested bachelor students on Tuesday, February 1, 14:00-16:00. For more information please check https://www.moodle.tum.de/course/view.php?id=75320 . Also Master students are welcome to join. </span></p>

suitable as
  • Bachelor’s Thesis Physics
Supervisor: Stefan Schönert

Current and Finished Theses in the Group

Characterization of Wavelength Shifters for Rare-Event Search Experiments with a VUV Spectrofluorometer
Abschlussarbeit im Masterstudiengang Physik (Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik)
Themensteller(in): Stefan Schönert
A New Limit on Radiative Neutrinoless Double Electron Capture of ³⁶Ar
Abschlussarbeit im Masterstudiengang Physik (Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik)
Themensteller(in): Stefan Schönert
Development of the NUCLEUS 10g Cryogenic Detector for Exploring Coherent Elastic Neutrino Nucleus Scattering
Abschlussarbeit im Masterstudiengang Physik (Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik)
Themensteller(in): Raimund Strauß
Development of an Organic Plastic Scintillator based Muon Veto Operating at Sub-Kelvin Temperatures for the NUCLEUS Experiment
Abschlussarbeit im Masterstudiengang Physik (Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik)
Themensteller(in): Raimund Strauß
First Constraint on the Relic Neutrino Background with KATRIN Data
Abschlussarbeit im Masterstudiengang Physik (Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik)
Themensteller(in): Susanne Mertens
Liquid Argon: Purification and Xenon-Doping for LEGEND
Abschlussarbeit im Masterstudiengang Physik (Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik)
Themensteller(in): Stefan Schönert
Pulseshape Discrimination against Ar-39 Beta Decays Using the Full Exposure of the DEAP-3600 Dark Matter Search Experiment
Abschlussarbeit im Masterstudiengang Physik (Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik)
Themensteller(in): Stefan Schönert
Signal Modeling of Silicon Photomultipliers and Characterization of the Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays for the LEGEND Neutrinoless ββ Decay Experiment.
Abschlussarbeit im Bachelorstudiengang Physik
Themensteller(in): Stefan Schönert
Transition Edge Sensor Design for a CRESST Detector Module with an Active Surface Veto Operating at Low Energy Threshold
Abschlussarbeit im Bachelorstudiengang Physik
Themensteller(in): Stefan Schönert
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