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Prof. Dr. Rudolf Gross

Photo von Prof. Dr. rer. nat. habil. Rudolf Gross.
Phone
+49 89 289-14249
Room
E-Mail
rudolf.gross@tum.de
Links
Homepage
Page in TUMonline
Group
Technical Physics
Job Title
Professorship on Technical Physics
Consultation Hour
on appointment

Courses and Dates

Title and Module Assignment
ArtSWSLecturer(s)Dates
Applied Superconductivity: Josephson Effects, Superconducting Electronics and Superconducting Quantum Circuits
eLearning course course documents
Assigned to modules:
VO 4 Fedorov, K. Gross, R. Mon, 14:15–15:45, WMI 143
Wed, 14:15–15:45, WMI 143
Condensed Matter Physics 2
Assigned to modules:
VO 4 Gross, R. Tue, 12:00–14:00, PH HS2
Tue, 08:30–10:00, PH HS2
Mon, 12:15–14:00, PH HS2
Mon, 10:00–11:30, PH HS2
Superconductivity and Low Temperature Physics 2
eLearning course course documents
Assigned to modules:
VO 2 Gross, R. Hackl, R. Thu, 12:00–14:00, virtuell
Advances in Solid State Physics
course documents
Assigned to modules:
PS 2 Deppe, F. Gross, R. Hübl, H.
Assisstants: Althammer, M.Geprägs, S.
Tue, 10:15–11:45, virtuell
and singular or moved dates
Summer Academy Sarntal, Course 3 "Physics and Electronics in Everyday Life"
course documents
Assigned to modules:
PS 4 Gross, R.
Superconducting Quantum Circuits
eLearning course course documents current information
Assigned to modules:
PS 2 Deppe, F. Fedorov, K. Gross, R. Marx, A. Tue, 14:30–16:00, WMI 143
Tutorial to Applied Superconductivity: Josephson Effects, Superconducting Electronics and Superconducting Quantum Circuits
course documents
Assigned to modules:
UE 2 Fedorov, K. Gross, R. dates in groups
Exercise to Condensed Matter Physics 2
Assigned to modules:
UE 2
Responsible/Coordination: Gross, R.
dates in groups
Tutorial to Superconductivity and Low Temperature Physics 2
eLearning course course documents
Assigned to modules:
UE 2
Responsible/Coordination: Gross, R.
dates in groups
Tutorial to Condensed Matter Physics 2
course documents
Assigned to modules:
UE 1 Gross, R. Wed, 10:00–12:00, virtuell
Colloquium on Solid State Physics
current information
Assigned to modules:
KO 2 Gross, R. Thu, 17:00–19:00, PH HS3
and singular or moved dates
FOPRA Experiment 16: Josephson Effects in Superconductors
current information
Assigned to modules:
PR 1 Gross, R.
Assisstants: Chen, Q.Nojiri, Y.
Walther-Meißner-Seminar on Topical Problems of Low Temperature Physics
current information
Assigned to modules:
SE 2 Althammer, M. Deppe, F. Einzel, D. Gross, R. Hackl, R. … (insgesamt 8) Fri, 11:00–12:30, WMI 143

Offered Bachelor’s or Master’s Theses Topics

Controlling magnon transport in antiferromagnetic insulators
In antiferromagnetic insulators, we obtain two magnon modes with opposite spin chirality due to the two opposing magnetic sublattices. In this way, magnon transport in antiferromagnetic insulators can be considered as the magnonic equivalent of spin transport via electrons. The aim of this thesis is to obtain a better understanding of the magnon transport in antiferromagnetic insulators and investigate external control parameters that allow a manipulation of the spin information transport in the antiferromagnetic insulator. Moreover, these experiments allow to extract important transport properties like for example the magnon spin life-time. We are looking for resourceful master student heavily interested in these magnon transport experiments. In order to answer questions regarding magnon transport in magnetic insulators, your thesis will contain aspects of the fabrication of nano-scale devices using electron beam lithography as well as ultra-sensitive low-noise electronic measurements in a cryogenic environment.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
Josephson Ring Modulator Coupler Measurement
Adiabatic Quantum Computation aims at finding the solution for optimization problems by adiabatic Hamiltonian evolution. Physically, the problems are encoded in the so-called Ising Hamiltonian and the task is to find the state of lowest energy, the ground state. As can be seen in the Ising Hamiltonian, all spins have to interact with all other spins to be able to deal with general optimization problems. In practice, achieving this all-to-all connectivity is a hard task. A particularly promising approach is the so-called Lechner-Hauke-Zoller architecture, which we want to implement with superconducting circuits. There, one of the fundamental building block is a Josephson ring modulator coupler featuring the strong ZZ interaction. Your task will be the experimental characterization of the JRM coupler. You will analyze the ZZ interaction strength in the on-state and the parasitic cross-talk between the qubits in the off-state of the coupler. Ultimately, you will realize a simple quantum annealing protocol.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Quantum Science & Technology
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
Josephson Ring Modulator Coupler Measurement
Adiabatic Quantum Computation aims at finding the solution for optimization problems by adiabatic Hamiltonian evolution. Physically, the problems are encoded in the so-called Ising Hamiltonian and the task is to find the state of lowest energy, the ground state. As can be seen in the Ising Hamiltonian, all spins have to interact with all other spins to be able to deal with general optimization problems. In practice, achieving this all-to-all connectivity is a hard task. A particularly promising approach is the so-called Lechner-Hauke-Zoller architecture, which we want to implement with superconducting circuits. There, one of the fundamental building block is a Josephson ring modulator coupler featuring the strong ZZ interaction. Your task will be the experimental characterization of the JRM coupler. You will analyze the ZZ interaction strength in the on-state and the parasitic cross-talk between the qubits in the off-state of the coupler. Ultimately, you will realize a simple quantum annealing protocol.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
Observation of quantum switching in driven-dissipative superconducting oscillators
Classical nonlinear systems are known to exhibit metastable behaviour, where spontaneous transitions may take place. These transitions are often associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking and can be viewed as classical phase transitions. However, recent developments in quantum theory of driven-dissipative nonlinear resonators reveal that the underlying switching processes may be of purely quantum nature. This can be experimentally observed during the transient dynamics in nonlinear superconducting resonators. An immediate goal of this master project is to experimentally study switching dynamics in driven Josephson parametric amplifiers (JPAs) and observe quantum features, such as vacuum squeezing and Wigner function negativity, in the associated transient resonator states. The far-reaching goals of this research are related to fundamental investigation of quantum phase transitions in novel driven-dissipative superconducting systems, such as quantum metamaterials. In the framework of this project, the student will experimentally employ existing JPA devices as both the driven-dissipative system and quantum preamplifiers. The latter will be the key for efficient observation and quantum tomography of the transient JPA dynamics. More specifically, the tasks of the master student will consist of the FPGA programming, construction of an experimental set-up in a dilution refrigerator, cryogenic microwave measurements, and data analysis in collaboration with external theory partners. This project will be an important integral part of our various activities on quantum microwave communication, where JPAs are employed as the key building blocks. These activities are supported within the framework of the MCQST cluster, QMiCS project (EU Quantum Flagship), QuaMToMe project (BMBF, "Grand Challenge der Quantenkommunikation"), and will also have a significant overlap with the QuaRaTe project (BMBF) on quantum sensing.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Quantum Science & Technology
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
Observation of quantum switching in driven-dissipative superconducting oscillators
Classical nonlinear systems are known to exhibit metastable behaviour, where spontaneous transitions may take place. These transitions are often associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking and can be viewed as classical phase transitions. However, recent developments in quantum theory of driven-dissipative nonlinear resonators reveal that the underlying switching processes may be of purely quantum nature. This can be experimentally observed during the transient dynamics in nonlinear superconducting resonators. An immediate goal of this master project is to experimentally study switching dynamics in driven Josephson parametric amplifiers (JPAs) and observe quantum features, such as vacuum squeezing and Wigner function negativity, in the associated transient resonator states. The far-reaching goals of this research are related to fundamental investigation of quantum phase transitions in novel driven-dissipative superconducting systems, such as quantum metamaterials. In the framework of this project, the student will experimentally employ existing JPA devices as both the driven-dissipative system and quantum preamplifiers. The latter will be the key for efficient observation and quantum tomography of the transient JPA dynamics. More specifically, the tasks of the master student will consist of the FPGA programming, construction of an experimental set-up in a dilution refrigerator, cryogenic microwave measurements, and data analysis in collaboration with external theory partners. This project will be an important integral part of our various activities on quantum microwave communication, where JPAs are employed as the key building blocks. These activities are supported within the framework of the MCQST cluster, QMiCS project (EU Quantum Flagship), QuaMToMe project (BMBF, "Grand Challenge der Quantenkommunikation"), and will also have a significant overlap with the QuaRaTe project (BMBF) on quantum sensing.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
Superconducting devices based on superconductor/ferromagnet heterostructures
The combination of ferromagnetic and superconducting materials leads to intriguing proximity effects at the interface of the two materials. The goal of this thesis is to investigate the spin transport of superconductor/ferromagnet interfaces and model the obtained results in the framework of proximity effects. To this end, we will fabricate superconducting devices based on superconductor/ferromagent heterostructures with a special focus on controlling magnetization dynamics via superconducting charge currents. This requires investigations at low temperatures around the critical temperature of the superconductor in large magnetic fields. In addition microwave magnetic fields will be employed to drive magnetization dynamics in the ferromagnet and excitations in the superconductor. We are looking for a talented master student to investigate spin transport in superconductor/ferromagnet heterostructures. You will fabricate superconductor/ferromagnet heterostructures using our new UHV sputtering system. As a next step, you will structure these blanket films with optical and electron beam lithography into superconducting devices. Finally, you will characterize your fabricated samples at low temperatures utilizing superconducting magnet cryostats. Here, high frequency spin dynamics as well magnetotransport studies are the focus of your thesis.
suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
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