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Prof. Dr. rer. nat. habil. Rudolf Gross

Photo von Prof. Dr. rer. nat. habil. Rudolf Gross.
Phone
+49 89 289-14201
Room
E-Mail
rudolf.gross@tum.de
Links
Homepage
Page in TUMonline
Group
Engineering Physics
Job Title
Professorship on Engineering Physics
Consultation Hour
on appointment

Courses and Dates

Title and Module Assignment
ArtSWSLecturer(s)Dates
Applied Superconductivity: Josephson Effects, Superconducting Electronics and Superconducting Quantum Circuits Assigned to modules:
VO 4 Fedorov, K. Gross, R. Tue, 16:15–17:45, PH II 127
Wed, 12:30–14:00, PH II 127
Condensed Matter Physics 2 Assigned to modules:
VO 4 Gross, R. Mon, 12:15–14:00, PH HS2
Tue, 08:30–10:00, PH HS2
Tue, 12:00–14:00, PH HS2
Mon, 10:00–11:30, PH HS2
Superconductivity and Low Temperature Physics 2 Assigned to modules:
VO 2 Gross, R. Hackl, R. Thu, 12:00–14:00, PH HS3
Advances in Solid State Physics Assigned to modules:
PS 2 Deppe, F. Gross, R. Hübl, H.
Assisstants: Althammer, M.Geprägs, S.Marx, A.Opel, M.Weiler, M.
Tue, 10:15–11:45
Superconducting Quantum Circuits Assigned to modules:
PS 2 Deppe, F. Fedorov, K. Gross, R. Marx, A. Tue, 14:30–16:00
Tutorial to Applied Superconductivity: Josephson Effects, Superconducting Electronics and Superconducting Quantum Circuits Assigned to modules:
UE 2 Fedorov, K. Gross, R. dates in groups
Exercise to Condensed Matter Physics 2 Assigned to modules:
UE 2
Responsible/Coordination: Gross, R.
dates in groups
Tutorial to Superconductivity and Low Temperature Physics 2 Assigned to modules:
UE 2 Gross, R. Hackl, R. dates in groups
Tutorial to Condensed Matter Physics 2 Assigned to modules:
UE 1 Gross, R. Wed, 10:00–12:00, PH HS2
and singular or moved dates
Colloquium on Solid State Physics Assigned to modules:
KO 2 Gross, R. Thu, 17:00–19:00, PH HS3
FOPRA Experiment 16: Josephson Effects in Superconductors Assigned to modules:
PR 1 Gross, R.
Assisstants: Fischer, M.Rager, G.Wimmer, T.
Mentoring in the Bachelor's Program Physics (Professors A–J) Assigned to modules:
KO 0.2 Auwärter, W. Back, C. Bandarenka, A. Barth, J. Bausch, A. … (insgesamt 21)
Responsible/Coordination: Höffer von Loewenfeld, P.
Walther-Meißner-Seminar on Topical Problems of Low Temperature Physics Assigned to modules:
SE 2 Althammer, M. Deppe, F. Einzel, D. Gönnenwein, S. Gross, R. … (insgesamt 9) Fri, 13:30–14:45

Offered Bachelor’s or Master’s Theses Topics

Elektrisch gesteuerter Magnontransport in magnetisch geordneten Isolatoren

Angular momentum transport in magnetically ordered insulators is carried by magnetic excitation quanta in contrast to magnetic conductors, where mobile charge carrier also carry angular momentum. In magnetically ordered insulator/normal metal hybrids it is possible to study the transport of angular momentum by all-electrical means via the spin Hall and inverse spin Hall effect in the normal metal. The focus of this project is the investigation of possibilities to manipulate the angular momentum transport in the magnetically ordered insulator by electrical means and by finite size effects. In addition, another goal is the enhancement of the sensitivity of the currently existing measurement setup and the realization of new measurement protocols in hard- and software.

An ambitious master student with good analytical skills is required to carry out these experiments on all-electrical magnon transport. One part of the thesis is the fabrication of nanometer sized devices for the experiments via electron beam lithography and UHV sputtering. The properties of these devices will be analyzed using magnetotransport experiments in superconducting magnet cryostats. Another important aspect is the realization of more sophisticated measurement methods, aiming for a enhancement in sensitivity, a better signal-to-noise ratios and a higher versatility of the measurement protocols

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
High-field magnetotransport in an organic superconductor in proximity to the quantum spin-liquid Mott-insulating state

One of topical issues of the modern condensed matter physics is the interplay between superconducting and insulating instabilities of the normal metallic state in materials with strong electronic correlations. Organic metals and superconductors, thanks to their high crystal quality, simple conduction bands, and a great diversity of electronic states, offer a perfect laboratory for studying fundamental problems of the correlated electron physics. A member of the κ-(ET)2X family to be studied in this Master thesis is believed to represent a novel state of matter, quantum spin liquid at ambient pressure. Under a moderate pressure of about 3 kbar the material becomes metallic and superconducting.

The aim of the work is to trace the evolution of the electronic properties, particularly, of correlation effects, in close proximity to the metal-insulator phase boundary. The position with respect to the phase boundary will be precisely tuned by applying quasi-hydrostatic pressure. Magnetoresistance and especially its quantum oscillations in strong magnetic fields will be used to probe the electronic properties of the system. Observation of the oscillations requires sufficiently low temperatures which will be achieved by use of a 3He cryostat (down to 0.4 K) and of a 3He-4He dilution refrigerator (down to below 100 mK). A part of the experiment will be done at the European Magnetic Field Laboratory in steady fields up to 30 T or in pulsed fields up to 80 T. The experimental results will be analyzed in comparison with recent theoretical predictions of correlation effects and violations of the Fermi-liquid behavior in proximity to the spin-liquid Mott-insulating state.

Physics: Correlated electron systems; metal-insulator transition; magnetic quantum oscillations; unconventional superconductivity.

Techniques: Strong magnetic fields; high pressures; cryogenic (liquid 4He; 3He; dilution fridge) techniques; high-precision magnetoresistance measurements.

Contact person: Mark Kartsovnik (mark.kartsovnik@wmi.badw.de)

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
Interaction between magnetic and conducting subsystems in molecular antiferromagnetic superconductors

Multifunctional materials combining nontrivial conducting and magnetic properties are one of hot topics in the modern condensed matter physics. Prominent examples are charge transfer salts of the organic donor BETS with anions containing a transition metal. They represent perfect multilayer structures of conducting and magnetic subsystems separated on a nanometer scale. The interplay between the two subsystems results in a variety of electronic and magnetic ground states depending on subtle chemical substitutions as well as on external magnetic field and pressure. The goal of this master thesis is a quantitative study of the interaction between the itinerant electrons and localized spins in the antiferromagnetic superconductors (BETS)2FeX4 with X = Cl, Br. To this end, comparative measurements of quantum oscillations in the magnetoresistance and magnetization will be carried out at strong magnetic fields, at temperatures down to 0.4 K. The results will be analyzed in terms of the exchange field dependent spin-splitting effect in a quasi-two-dimensional metal.

Physics: Correlated electronic systems; magnetic ordering and superconductivity; magnetic quantum oscillations.

Techniques: Strong magnetic fields; magnetotransport; magnetic torque; cryogenic (liquid 4He and 3He) techniques.

Contact person: Mark Kartsovnik (mark.kartsovnik@wmi.badw.de)

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
Manipulation von Spin-Wellen durch Spin-Bahn-Drehmomente

The field of magnonics deals with exploiting the collective spin dynamics (spin waves) of magnetically ordered materials for computational purposes. Efficient and scalable schemes for controlling spin waves in thin film ferromagnets thus have large application relevance. The magnetic torques arising due to the spin-orbit interaction allow to control spin waves by electric currents and acoustic waves at GHz frequencies. We are particularly interested in a spatially-resolved study of the interaction of spin waves with acoustic and current-induced torques in nanopatterned devices with application potential for spintronics.

We are looking for a talented and highly motivated master student who is interested in joining our spin dynamics project. During your thesis, you will use state-of-the-art nanolithography and thin film deposition tools to fabricate hybrid devices that allow for the interaction of spin waves with electrical currents and acoustic waves. You will study spin waves in these devices using optical and microwave spectroscopy methods.

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
Topologische magnetische Phasen in Dünnschicht-Heterostrukturen

The broken inversion symmetry at the interface of thin film ferromagnets and normal metals with strong spin-orbit coupling can give rise to chiral magnetic order. These chiral magnetic materials show exotic magnetic properties such as a skyrmion lattice phase and have strong application potential for future spintronic devices. For these applications, a detailed understanding of the magnetization dynamics in these materials is required. The goal of this master thesis is to fabricate such thin film multilayer structures using sputter deposition techniques and analyze their dynamic magnetic properties using broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

We are looking for a highly motivated master student to carry out these experiments on interfacial effects in metallic multilayers. The thesis work will be split up into of the fabrication of these multilayer structures using UHV sputter deposition systems and determining their magnetic properties by broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry.

suitable as
  • Master’s Thesis Condensed Matter Physics
  • Master’s Thesis Applied and Engineering Physics
Supervisor: Rudolf Gross
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